Survey shows many teens confused about distracted driving

This article looks at why many teens have a skewed definition of distracted driving.

Distracted driving is one of the most dangerous things people can do. As CNN reports, every day across the country over 1,000 people are injured and eight killed in distracted driving accidents. Furthermore, because of underreporting, the actual toll that distracted driving takes is assumed to be much higher. A recent survey suggests that one of the reasons distracted driving car accidents have become so prevalent is because many drivers, especially young drivers, have a skewed view of what, exactly, constitutes distracted driving.

Survey results

The survey asked 2,500 teenaged drivers about their driving behaviors and their views on distracted driving. As Forbes reports, the survey showed that just 27 percent of teen drivers say they have texted while driving; however, 68 percent of them are using apps on their smartphones when behind the wheel.

What is particularly worrying, however, is that many teens do not seem to have an appreciation for just how dangerous "apping while driving" is. The same survey found that 80 percent of teen drivers considered the use of such apps to be "not distracting" while driving. Of course, apping while driving is extremely dangerous since it takes the driver's attention away from the road.

Making the roads safer

The survey is alarming, but it should also serve as a reminder to parents and safety experts about how they can do a better job of teaching young drivers about road safety. Parents should set clear rules for their children about what is acceptable when it comes to distracted driving. Instead of simply banning texting and driving, for example, parents should insist that phones be kept on silent and out of reach when their teenage sons or daughters are driving.

The best thing parents can do is to set an example for their children. Sadly, another recent survey found that distracted driving is not a problem limited to teen drivers alone. That survey found that 74 percent of drivers of all ages use Facebook while driving. Such alarming figures suggest that parents need to lead by example and put their phones away in order to teach their children how to be safe on the road.

Personal injury law

A car accident can be a painful and traumatic event. Not only do victims have to deal with physical injuries, but they may also be forced to cope with the financial fallout those injuries lead to, such as lost income and medical bills. A personal injury attorney can help crash victims in a number of ways, including by potentially helping pursue claims against any at-fault driver. By contacting an attorney today, accidents victims will have a dedicated representative on their side fighting for their rights.